Oakland Zoo is committed to improved global health and preservation of biodiversity and is involved in wildlife conservation projects spanning the globe. In the San Francisco Bay Area, Oakland Zoo is deeply engaged in efforts to preserve critically endangered California species.

TREATING AND REHABILITATING CALIFORNIA CONDORS

The Steve and Jackie Kane Condor Recovery Center is the first and only condor treatment and rehabilitation facility in Northern California. As part of an elite group in the California Condor Recovery Program, our staff are trained in field research and the vital medical treatments these giant birds need to recover from lead poisoning and other injuries. Find out more ...

Partners: Ventana Wildlife Society, Los Angeles Zoo, San Diego Zoo, Pinnacles National Park

SUPPORTING RESEARCH AND RELOCATION FOR WILD
MOUNTAIN LIONS

Oakland Zoo co-spearheads BACAT (Bay Area Cougar Action Team), an alliance that supports humane interactions with local wildlife, offering staff expertise, capture equipment, and a state-of-the-art veterinary facility to provide temporary care for big cats. We are also engaged in the first-ever research of the mountain lion population in the Bay Area. This work will be critical in determining land use issues and locations for wildlife corridors. Find out more ...

Partners: California Dept. of Fish & Wildlife, Bay Area Puma Project, Mountain Lion Foundation

RAISING WESTERN POND TURTLE HATCHLINGS FOR RELEASE INTO THE WILD

Oakland Zoo helped to launch the first Western Pond Turtle head-starting program in California, which includes raising and releasing hatchlings, research, in-field studies, and education. Currently, hatchlings are raised in the Zoo until they are large enough to be less vulnerable to predators. Find out more ...

Partners: Sonoma State University, San Francisco Zoo

INITIATING NEW PARTNERSHIPS TO SAVE ENDANGERED MOUNTAIN YELLOW-LEGGED FROGS

This program involves field work and conservation efforts to save these frogs from the devastating Chytrid (kit-TRID) fungus, in addition to other threats. The project’s goal is to reintroduce captive bred froglets who are resistant to the fungus, back to lakes and streams, and work to protect critical habitat throughout their range. Find out more ...

Partners: San Francisco State University, San Francisco Zoo

CREATING AND MAINTAINING NATURAL SPACES FOR NATIVE WILDLIFE IN AND AROUND OAKLAND ZOO

We work with volunteers to preserve natural spaces and create habitats such as butterfly gardens and other native plantings, which are havens for Knowland Park wildlife, including amphibians, reptiles, and birds.

Partners: Community volunteers and visitors like you

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